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Intake Power Shutter with Light Trap

Product Description:
Using light deprivation to control plant and animal growth is a strategy many growers are implementing today. For greenhouses, without the proper ventilation during the light deprivation state, heat, mold, and disease can quickly destroy your crop. For animal agriculture buildings, such as poultry houses, the importance of ventilation is imperative to life, growth, and production success of your animals. Limit light while increasing your bottom line with J&D's Intake Power Shutter with Light Trap today!

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Key Features:

  • 1.5 million : 1 light reduction factor
  • Easy-to-clean PVC slats
  • Simple to assemble
  • Nylon light trap clips for tool-less light trap removal
  • Housing is 18 gauge, corrosion-resistant, galvanized stainless-steel
  • Housing was designed so light trap mounts flush to the interior of the building, freeing up valuable space in your facility and eliminating a protruding ledge that can collect debris and possible pathogens
  • The perfect inlet for your operation to get airflow without the light

Applications:

  • Greenhouse
  • Poultry
Part - Details
LD36 36" Light Dep Inlet W/ Motorized Shutter
LD42 42" Light Dep Inlet W/Motorized Shutter
LD48 48" Light Dep Inlet W/Motorized Shutter
LD54 54" Light Dep Inlet W/Motorized Shutter
LD60 60" Light Dep Inlet W/Motorized Shutter
Part #
LD36
Details
36" Light Dep Inlet W/ Motorized Shutter
Part #
LD42
Details
42" Light Dep Inlet W/Motorized Shutter
Part #
LD48
Details
48" Light Dep Inlet W/Motorized Shutter
Part #
LD54
Details
54" Light Dep Inlet W/Motorized Shutter
Part #
LD60
Details
60" Light Dep Inlet W/Motorized Shutter

Product Details:

Part # Details
LD36 36" Light Dep Inlet W/ Motorized Shutter
LD42 42" Light Dep Inlet W/Motorized Shutter
LD48 48" Light Dep Inlet W/Motorized Shutter
LD54 54" Light Dep Inlet W/Motorized Shutter
LD60 60" Light Dep Inlet W/Motorized Shutter

Product Details:

Part # Details
LD36 36" Light Dep Inlet W/ Motorized Shutter
LD42 42" Light Dep Inlet W/Motorized Shutter
LD48 48" Light Dep Inlet W/Motorized Shutter
LD54 54" Light Dep Inlet W/Motorized Shutter
LD60 60" Light Dep Inlet W/Motorized Shutter

FAQs:

Inlets are an essential part of your complete ventilation system. They bring fresh air into your barn or building where it is properly mixed and then circulated and exhausted. A well designed and well located inlet system is more important for good ventilation than the fans themselves.
One of the biggest mistakes when designing a ventilation system is not providing a proper inlet. This will depend on many factors and variables. In order to get the most out of your inlet system, please contact our knowledgable Engineering and Sales staff that can assist you in this process.
No. You only need to frame 2 of the 4 sides.
Attic air inlets are used in poultry houses to allow growers to capture warmer attic air for minimum ventilation, which helps reduce heating fuel costs and relative humidity, along with improving litter quality.
The most common issues are installing the inlets in houses that are not tight, not configuring the correct number of inlets, not understanding the limitations of the attic as an incoming air source, and not understanding the management required in inlet systems.
If your motor arm won’t rotate on your motorized shutter kit, please check these three things:

1. Check that the chain is rigged properly. To do this, with the shutter closed, rig the chain with minimum slack and insert the “s-hook” in the outboard hole of the lever arm, with the arm in the 11 to 12 o’clock position.

2. Check the wiring. For 120 volt wiring, twist the red and brown wires together and connect to the thermostat switch leg. Connect the black and white wires together and connect to the neutral. For 240 volt wiring, twist the black and brown wires together and cap with a wire nut. Then connect the red wire to the thermostat switch leg (L1) and the white wire to Line 2.

3. Check the thermostat. The thermostat set points need to be set below the ambient temperature.
This is actually a misconception. This motor is designed to accommodate shutters ranging in size from 10″ single panel to 60″ double panel without damage. The rigging chain to the outboard hole in the lever arm will generate less torque and provide the maximum travel.
The motor is designed for clockwise rotation only. The extension spring plus the weight of the louver panel is sufficient to pull the arm back to the start position.
The lever arm is not mounted properly. Position the arm on the shaft so that the set screws are facing away from the motor housing. Slide it on all of the way and then back it off about 1/16″. Snug the set screws. Do not over tighten. With the shutter closed, rig the chain with minimum slack and insert the “s-hook” in the outboard hole of the lever arm, with the arm in the 11 to 12 o’clock position.
If your lever arm is striking the motor, there is too much slack in your chain. Position the arm on the shaft so that the set screws are facing away from the motor housing. Slide it on all of the way and then back it off about 1/16″. Snug the set screws. Do not over tighten. With the shutter closed, rig the chain with minimum slack and insert the “s-hook” in the outboard hole of the lever arm, with the arm in the 11 to 12 o’clock position.
There is too much slack in the chain. With the shutter closed, rig the chain with minimum slack and insert the “s-hook” in the outboard hole of the lever arm, with the arm in the 11 to 12 o’clock position.
There are two possible reasons for this.

1. The static pressure is too high. You may require a 2 stage thermostat to allow the shutters to open on stage 1 and the fan(s) to start on stage 2.

2. There is too much slack in the chain. With the shutter closed, rig the chain with minimum slack and insert the “s-hook” in the outboard hole of the lever arm, with the arm in the 11 to 12 o’clock position.